From Fact To Mythology The Fae – Cara St. Louis

From Fact To Mythology The Fae – Cara St. Louis

From Fact To Mythology The Fae – Cara St. Louis

New research shows that ancient humans had sex with a "ghost species" of "proto human". For the first time, scientists in the US have successfully edited the DNA of human embryos using the gene-editing tool, CRISPR and Sino Gene produced Longlong, the world's first genetically modified, cloned “super dog” and genetically engineered salmon has reached the dinner table. With a little spit you can sequence your DNA at Helix.com. DARPA announced the Neural Engineering System Design program that can be implanted into the brain and provide precise communication between the brain and the digital world and more robotic space planes are set to orbit the planet.

With a world presently this strange, how fantastical is a description of the Fae and their original conquests? How did they deal with the first humans, and does their legacy run into the present day? Analysis of megaliths and sacred sites show an all-out attempt to hide the fact that the fae ever existed! What does it mean for humanity and the role of the Catholic Church? Even among fantasy devotees who recognize J.R.R. Tolkien as the father of the modern genre, few realize that Tolkien insisted that The Lord of the Rings is "a fundamentally religious and Catholic work." This probably comes as a surprise to most Catholics as well.

Dangerous Imagination, Silent Assimilation is the territory covered by activist, teacher and journalist Cara St.Louis. Cara was a producer at The People’s Voice TV, a contributing editor at Veteran’s Today, a novelist (Consolata’s Companion) and activist esoteric researcher (The Sun Thief). Her work has been translated into German and Spanish. There is so much more to the social engineering and cultural implosion of the 20th Century, which Cara calls the Stolen Century. Would it surprise you to find that there is every likelihood a false 1000 years of history has been inserted into our timeline to justify royal expansionism?

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